20% of world's electricity could come from solar power on northern summer solstice, thinktank says

20% of world's electricity could come from solar power on northern summer solstice, thinktank says


People watch the sunrise as they take part in the summer solstice at Stonehenge in Wiltshire on Friday, June 21, 2024.

People watch the sunrise as they take part in the summer solstice at Stonehenge in Wiltshire on Friday, June 21, 2024. | Photo credit: AP

The world's solar power has enough potential to produce a fifth of the Northern Hemisphere's peak midday electricity needs during the longest day of the year, up 16% from last year, according to a report released Friday by thinktank Ember.

why is it important?

Some researchers say that solar energy is currently the fastest growing source of electricity due to declining technology costs, and is expected to become the largest source of electricity before 2050.

Last year, solar power produced a record 5.5% of global electricity, and 34 of the world’s economies now generate more than 10% of their electricity from solar power, the Ember report said.

Context

The Northern Hemisphere summer solstice on June 21 is the longest day of the year, but all days in June are of similar length so that the solar output on that day will be close to the monthly average, based on calculating a weighted average of hourly solar output data.

Ember estimates that 89% of the world's solar panels are installed in the Northern Hemisphere.

By number

Based on a 24-hour average, solar power could provide 8.2% of the global total electricity on June 21.

For the month of June, Ember expects solar power's share of total power generation to reach 9.6% in China, the world's largest solar market.

The share of solar power in the European Union is estimated at 20% in June, while the share for the United States and India is expected to be 6.9% and 7.1%, respectively.

Key Quotes

“With a 20% share, solar energy is now a serious global power source,” said Kostansa Rangelova, power analyst at Ember.

“Battery costs have fallen enormously, meaning solar energy is now being used not just during the day, but also in the evening.” (Report by Nina Chestney)


join us for quick updates

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Enable Notifications OK No thanks